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FINNON

FINNON

LAKE

LAKE

 Notice: www.finnonlake.com is not associated with the lake’s owning entity.  Click Me!

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AREA ACTIVITIES

& RESTORATION

AREA ACTIVITIES

& RESTORATION

Sadly, there always seems to be sad news to go along with the good and here is Finnon’s ……


With summer comes extended daylight and heat and both affect the water.  Algal “breakouts” have begun along the shoreline of the lake. Algae are photosynthetic microorganisms that are found in most aquatic habitats. Algae love runoff nutrients, and an algae growth occurs when nutrient pollution and lots of sunlight create a rapid increase in the density of the algae.  While algae is a natural and important part of aquatic ecosystems, too much of it can have harmful effects. Many aquatic organisms need oxygen to breathe, and this comes from dissolved oxygen in the water. When sunlight doesn't reach the water, photosynthesis, an oxygen-producing process, decreases, and the animals that depend on dissolved oxygen literally suffocate in the water.


When an algae bloom does happen, the stream, river, lake, or ocean becomes covered with algae, which may create a thick mat of surface scum. Bright green colored blooms develop from cyanobacteria, which are also known as blue-green algae. Not only does this not look very nice, but it blocks sunlight from reaching the water underneath the surface, which can have far reaching consequences for the organisms living there.  


Here’s hoping the lake’s management group does something to correct this algal growth before it becomes a larger issue and turns into a bloom.  The US EPA has some ideas such as aeration/bubbling of the water, controlling the flow of nutrients into the water, and promoting water flow to name a few.  Of course for Finnon water flow would be next to impossible as there is no steady flow of water out of the lake. There is an inflow of water but it can’t even keep up with the rate of evaporation.  Aeration seems to be a viable option.   If you have any concerns about the lake’s health ask for it in writing by contacting the lake’s management via e-mail at-   mvfa95667@gmail.com

Click on any photo to enlarge.

Photos taken May 28, 2017

Not nice to wade through to enjoy the water!